Press

CSUCI receives $100,000 endowed Nursing Scholarship from Grossman Community Foundation

The event honors business, technology and faculty leaders, with scholarship awards to students achieving academic excellence.

 

May 15, 2017 — CSU Channel Islands (CSUCI) Nursing scholars in financial need will be able apply for a scholarship from the Dr. Richard Grossman Community Foundation beginning in the 2018-2019 school year.

The scholarship is possible because of a generous $100,000 donation from the Grossman Foundation that was presented April 20 at the 13th Annual Business & Technology Partnership Leadership Dinner at the Westlake Inn in Westlake Village.

The Dr. Richard Grossman Endowed Nursing Scholarship was presented in conjunction with the late Lon Morton, former Grossman Foundation board member and CEO & Co-Chief Investment Officer of Morton Capital Management.

Morton, a longtime friend of the late Dr. Grossman’s wife, Elizabeth Rice Grossman, suggested to the Grossman Foundation Board that the contribution be made to CSUCI’s nursing program.

“Dr. Grossman revered his nurses and gave them credit for his positive outcomes,” Elizabeth Grossman said. “He would be so pleased to honor them in this way at the school that was in his ‘backyard.’

“The Dr. Richard Grossman Community Foundation is honored to be affiliated with CSUCI and to continue Dr. Grossman’s legacy in such a meaningful way,” she added.

Morton was honored posthumously at the dinner as Business Leader of the Year, a celebration of his life witnessed by his family, friends and almost 180 guests at the leadership dinner.

After the tribute to Morton, CSUCI President Erika D. Beck accepted the $100,000 check for the scholarship to a burst of applause.

This generous gift allows a promising Nursing student to experience one of the signature programs at CSUCI,” Beck said. “We are profoundly grateful to the Grossman Foundation and we intend to let this gift benefit students who want to enter one of the region’s noblest professions. We plan to pay this gift forward year after year by graduating quality, professional nurses ready to enter the healthcare community.”

Although the campus is the newest in the CSU system, CSUCI’s Nursing program has been ranked 11th best out of 127 nursing programs in the state by RegisteredNursing.org. The organization provides information for nurses and nursing students in all 50 states.

The Dr. Richard Grossman Community Foundation was founded in December 2013 to serve local communities in Los Angeles and Ventura counties and is located at the offices of Morton Capital Management in Calabasas.  Dr. Richard Grossman was an internationally recognized plastic surgeon and pioneer in the comprehensive treatment of burn wounds.

While serving as the chief emergency room resident at Cook County Hospital in Chicago in 1958, Dr. Grossman treated victims of a catastrophic fire at Our Lady of Angels parochial elementary school, which claimed the lives of 93 children and four nuns.

The experience had a profound effect on Dr. Grossman and was a driving force behind his vision to create a world-class comprehensive burn treatment facility dedicated to providing the best burn care anywhere.

The Grossman Burn Center in West Hills is one of several comprehensive burn facilities across the United States, and has treated burn victims from around the world.

 


 

Boys & Girls Clubs earn big financial boost

                                                                                       By John Loesing newstip@theacorn.com

bg-2016-1st-pictureBENEFACTOR—Local Boys & Girls Clubs founder Cal Johnston, left, congratulates Westlake Village founding father John Notter, winner of the clubs’ 2016 Celebration of Philanthropy award. At right is Boys & Girls chief executive Mark Elswick. JOHN LOESING/Acorn Newspapers

 

The community held out a generous hand to the Boys & Girls Clubs of Greater Conejo Valley on Fri., Oct. 22.

The Agoura Hills-based organization received a pair of $1-million gifts from local benefactors, plus thousands of other dollars in live and silent auction donations during its 14th annual Stand Up For Kids gala event at the Four Seasons Hotel Westlake Village.

One of the large donations came from John Notter, a Westlake Village founding father and owner of Westlake Properties, Inc. (Westlake Inn, Bogies, Mediterraneo and Stonehaus), that will be used to complete the construction of a club at Redwood Middle School in Thousand Oaks. 

The John L. Notter Family Club at Redwood is named after the Swiss

immigrant who came to the United States with his family in 1941 when he was 7.

“I learned at an early age how critical education is for kids,” said Notter, now an 84-year-old international financier who is also chairman of the Ludwig Institute for Cancer Research and board member of the Conrad Hilton Foundation.

“There’s a common theme in all the things I’ve been involved in and one is higher education and the other is health.”

Notter received the clubs’ 2016 Celebration of Philanthropy award.

He and his wife, Doris, recently celebrated 60 years of marriage. They have 12 grandchildren.


b-girls-2016-2nd-picture

Elizabeth Grossman gave a $1-million donation to the clubs on behalf of the Dr. Richard Grossman Community Foundation. She is the wife of the late Dr. Richard Grossman of the Grossman Burn Center in West Hills.

“We love to fund organizations that stand the test of time,” Grossman said.

The Boys & Girls Clubs provide programs to 4,300 youth each year on nine public school campuses from Calabasas to Newbury Park. The Chaparral Club in Calabasas is the busiest and serves an average of 280 children a day. The Boys & Girls Clubs of Greater Conejo Valley chapter has won the parent organization’s Gold Award five years in a row for top membership growth.

The gala audience of 600 people included former chairman of the board Mark Bagaason, who received the Cal Johnston Service Award. Johnston is the local clubs’ founder. Bagaason joined the board in 2011 and has served in a number of capacities.

The 2016 Youth of the Year character and leadership awards went to Newbury Park High School senior Caitlin Marsa in the 14-years-and-older category and Gus Gress in the 13-and-under category.

Caitlin, who had divorced parents and an ill mother while growing up, overcame many hurdles on her way to becoming a bright and promising young lady.

“There will always be obstacles to bring you down, but you can’t give up,” she said.

Boys & Girls Clubs were there when she needed it, Caitlin said.

Other donations to the organization that were applauded at the gala include a $150,000 gift from Bud Marley, the former Las Virgenes schools superintendent. Marley’s donation will help open the organization’s newest club at the Agoura Hills/Calabasas Community Center.


 

thumbnail_boys%20%20girls%20check%2020161LARGE DONATION—Elizabeth Grossman presents a check for $1 million on behalf of the Richard Grossman Community Foundation to the Boys & Girls Clubs of Greater Conejo Valley. JOHN LOESING/Acorn Newspapers

 

 
The Mini Horses that Heal

Posted by Eve Marx

therapy-horses-500x430

We were at an event in San Pedro and a man whose son suffers from multiple disabilities – the boy doesn’t speak, he’s not mobile, he has to be strapped into his chair. In the midst of all this commotion my miniature horse Liberty Belle noticed the boy and she went right up to him. She brought her head to his.

“They immediately went into their own private world. Belle, as we call her, knew what this child needed. I wasn’t holding her. The child pressed his face right next to hers and she never moved her head. Gradually, all around us, people stopped talking. Everyone was mesmerized. The connection between this child and this horse transcended everything else happening close by. They stayed like that a long time. I was so proud of Belle. To witness the total healing connection between a person and these little horses is so unique, so profound. This is what I live for.”

These are the words of Victoria Nodiff-Netanel , founder of Mini Therapy Horses (www.minitherapyhorses.com), a non-profit, all volunteer organization based in southern California in the hills of Malibu. (That’s Victoria, above, with Steve Sullivan, vice president and co-founder, and two of the magical minis: Black Pearl, left, and Blue Moon, right.) Through partnerships with law enforcement agencies as well as children’s and veteran’s organizations including Ronald McDonald House, the Greater Los Angeles Veterans Hospital, the Los Angeles County Sheriff’s Department,

and the Los Angeles Mayor’s Crisis Response team, Mini Therapy Horses are certified first responders providing equine-assisted interactions to people and groups in need of comfort and relief.

After a single encounter with a tiny horse, human beings of all ages have smiled and spoken for the first time after their traumatic experience.

“We visit people in need and crisis outside of our core programming, such as patients in ICU, at-risk youth, people with disabilities, rape victims, and children at orphanages,” Victoria says. “It’s always about the horse and helping the person make the connection with the horse. They help many people and provide them with hope.”

She’s been doing this work for eight years. Her band of mini horses – Black Pearl, Willow Blue, Liberty Belle, American Valor, Blue Moon, Sweet Louise, and Bluebell – are highly trained for their work. They are small but mighty, between 27” and 29 inches at the withers. That means they’re much smaller than dogs like, say, a Great Dane.

“My horses are little princes and princesses,” says Victoria, a veteran horsewoman. “They are very loved and respected. Working in collaboration with the horse, we make ourselves emotionally available in every way to the person. It’s about opening our hearts and helping the person make a connection with the horse.”


 

 

We are proud to support the Mini Therapy Horses!

 

Mini Therapy Horses

 

Photo taken at Ronald McDonald House in Pasadena, CA.

 

 

 

                                                                                                A Story about Leadership: The Legacy of Dr. Richard Grossman

  Walden Bromley  

If you seek a leader of authority and trust, and of experience and confidence, look at what you do not see: No regal uniforms with ribbons, stars and medals, no retinue of armed guards and assistants, and no barking of orders and no sense of melodrama or fear.

Listen, instead, to the footsteps of a solitary man. Look for the tall and slender figure in a simple white coat and surgical scrubs, the silver-haired icon who symbolizes decades of respect and dignity.

Pay attention to the sound of his voice, and absorb his baritone of credibility and integrity, and make a mental inventory of his blue eyes and gentle hands because — before the sedation subsumes you, and the sensory rush leaves you — that man, and the doctors and nurses beside him, may very well be the reason you will survive . . . and flourish.

That man is Dr. A. Richard Grossman, the namesake of the Dr. Richard Grossman Community Foundation that upholds his legacy and embraces his extended family of friends, patients, colleagues and scholars throughout Southern California and around the world.

That man is a testament to leadership.

Dr. Grossman’s touch still heals the injured and comforts the afflicted because, whether we attribute this feeling to the incandescent power of his soul or some inexplicable mystery of the universe, there are thousands of people who will never forget — and there are many others who will always remember — that graceful touch.

                                                                                                         drg for article

We celebrate his life.

Indeed, we cannot refrain from referring to him in the present tense,

because, when we take the full measure of the man and think of the legions of professionals who perpetuate his exacting standards and emulate (in their own way) the principles of his bedside manner, we see so many points of light — we bask in the radiance of so many stars of life — that we know Dr. Grossman is among us.

To be a leader of this caliber requires a moral commitment to do good by enabling others to be well.

That is, you must put the patient’s interests first or, for the business owner who wants to apply this rule for his or her own benefit, you must place the consumer’s needs at the top of this list.

And, while that fact may seem obvious and though that rule is straightforward, the greatest obstacle to success is the very real (and predictable) temptation to search for short-cuts, to suspend disbelief and succumb to schemes and scams that hold the allure of instant fame and immediate riches.

You must, in other words, be resolute — you must never forsake your name, values or reputation — for the rewards that can only emerge from years of toil, tears and sweat.

A leader may be born with certain innate qualities but, regardless of the debate concerning nature versus nurture, a person may never seize the moment — we may not get the leaders we deserve — unless we follow Dr. Grossman’s example and encourage his “children,” his protégées and pupils (and others like them), who have it in their power to begin the world over again.

Let us, therefore, revive a poetic statement from Robert F. Kennedy by dedicating ourselves to what the Greeks wrote so many years ago: “To tame the savageness of man and make gentle the life of this world.”

Dr. Richard Grossman lived those words — his protégées live those words — for the good of all, in the name of all, by the graciousness of all.

Let us go forth, with renewed optimism and strength, as leaders.

Let us lead the way.


 

DR. RICHARD GROSSMAN COMMUNITY FOUNDATION DONATES $100,000 TO SURVIVOR RECOVERY AND SUPPORT PROGRAMS FOR WEST HILLS HOSPITAL & MEDICAL CENTER BURN PATIENTS

WEST HILLS, CA, FEBRUARY 2015 – Burn survivors and their family members who are being treated at West Hills Hospital & Medical Center are receiving a generous gift from The Dr. Richard Grossman Community Foundation today. A $100,000 grant awarded by the Foundation to the West Hills Hospital & Medical Center Auxiliary will support survivor patient assistance efforts and help fund an annual Family Camp. The money will also go toward providing temporary housing for families of burn survivors receiving treatment at the Grossman Burn Center at West Hills Hospital.

“I extend my sincere thanks and profound appreciation to the Dr. Richard Grossman Community Foundation for this generous and important donation,” said Douglas Long, President and CEO of West Hills Hospital & Medical Center. “Burn injury recovery extends beyond the hospital stay – the programs this grant will fund are a critically important part of the healing process.”

“This grant furthers the legacy of Dr. A. Richard Grossman whose namesake organization is a source of local success within its community, as well as a symbol of global leadership and civic activism. From enabling burn survivors to heal – physically and emotionally – to empowering students to pursue a college education, and uphold the principles of honor, decency, leadership and philanthropy, the achievements of one man – this beloved husband, father and grandfather – inspire others to do likewise. That is the living memorial to Dr. Grossman,” says Kris Postil, Board Member of The Dr. Richard Grossman Community Foundation.

                                                                                ###

West Hills Hospital & Medical Center’s Auxiliary is a non-commercial, non-sectarian, non-partisan volunteer organization whose purpose is to render service to the hospital and the community through activities to further charitable and educational programs.
West Hills Hospital & Medical Center offers the full complement of advanced technology, compassion and responsive care for the improvement of human life. Serving the community for more than 50 years, West Hills Hospital is ranked among the top centers for heart attack treatment response and is the first accredited Chest Pain Center in LA County. Recognized as an Advanced Stroke Center as designated by the Joint Commission, West Hills Hospital provides quality care that is close to home for many in the West Valley. For more information visit us online at WestHillsHospital.com.

The Dr. Richard Grossman Community Foundation, headquartered in Calabasas, California, invests in local community groups and resources in communities where its funds will have the greatest impact. Requests for funding will be by invitation only, and all grants will be carefully monitored for efficacy. The Foundation made its first grant to the Boys and Girls Club of the Conejo Valley in February 2014. For more information, please visit: http://drgcf.org/


 

The Dr. Richard Grossman Community Foundation Expands Scholarship Fund: Honoring the Children of First Responders in Los Angeles and Ventura County

The Dr. Richard Grossman Community Foundation announces the expansion of the Dr. Richard Grossman Scholarship Fund to include the children of first responders from, respectively, the Ventura County Sheriff’s Office and similar groups in Los Angeles County.

Two of the most recent beneficiaries of the Scholarship Fund are children of Ventura County Sheriff’s Deputies: Maisey Werre, who will attend the University of California, Berkeley; and Cynthia Norris, who plans to enroll at Moorpark College.

In addition, Maisey and Cynthia join four returning Scholars who are burn survivors.

“These new scholars are leaders of academic excellence and superb personal integrity. We want to thank Geoff Dean, Sheriff of Ventura

County, for his guidance throughout the selection process. Maisey and Cynthia represent the ideals of strength and sacrifice, which symbolize the efforts of first responders and the work this Foundation pursues,” says Lane Weitzman, Vice President of The Dr. Richard Grossman Community Foundation.

About The Dr. Richard Grossman Community Foundation
Headquartered in Calabasas, California, The Dr. Richard Grossman Community Foundation invests in local community groups and resources where its funds will have the greatest impact. Requests for Funding will be by invitation only, and all grants will be carefully monitored for efficacy. The Foundation made its first grant to the Boys and Girls Club of Conejo Valley in February 2014. For more information about the Foundation, please isit www.drgcf.org


 

The Dr. Richard Grossman Community Foundation Donates $105,000 to the Grossman Burn Center at West Hills Hospital & Medical Center

The Dr. Richard Grossman Community Foundation announces its $105,000 grant to the Grossman Burn Center at West Hills Hospital & Medical Center.

The Foundation’s gift furthers a variety of activities, including the Grossman Burn Center’s outreach on behalf of patients, burn survivors and their respective families; and funding for Family Condo, which provides temporary housing for the families of burn survivors undergoing treatment and healing at the Center’s facilities at West Hills Hospital.

The donation is also part of a sustained effort to support community-related causes, such as the Foundation’s previous contribution of $100,000 to the Boys and Girls Clubs of Greater Conejo Valley. The grant funds an after-school homework assistance, tutoring program called “Power Hour”.

“This grant is a continuation of the leadership of Dr. Richard Grossman, whose legacy extends across multiple generations and among patients throughout the world. Between the Grossman Burn Center’s
lifesaving work, and through our own series of initiatives

within the neighborhoods we serve, the beneficiaries of this award will come to know the name – and the man –who will always be a symbol of valor and volunteerism,” says Lane Weitzman, Vice President of The Dr. Richard Grossman Community Foundation.

About The Dr. Richard Grossman Community Foundation
Headquartered in Calabasas, California, The Dr. Richard Grossman Community Foundation invests in local community groups and resources where its funds will have the greatest impact. Requests for Funding will be by invitation only, and all grants will be carefully monitored for efficacy. The Foundation made its first grant to the Boys and Girls Club of Conejo Valley in February 2014. For more information about the Foundation, please visit www.drgcf.org.

About West Hills Hospital & Medical Center
Serving the San Fernando Valley for more than 50 years, West Hills Hospital offers the full complement of advanced technology, compassion and responsive care for the improvement of human life. Home to the renowned Grossman Burn Center, West Hills Hospital provides quality care that is close to home. For more information visit us online at www.WestHillsHospital.com.


 

The Dr. Richard Grossman Community Foundation Names Kris Postil to Board of Directors: Longtime Volunteer, Executive and Advocate for Burn Survivors

The Dr. Richard Grossman Community Foundation announces the appointment of Kristen (Kris) Postil to the Foundation’s Board of Directors.

A third-generation Californian and a dedicated volunteer on behalf of a variety educational and civic organizations such as Chaminade College Preparatory School, the National Charity League and the Volunteer League of the San Fernando Valley, Kris is also a former member of the Board of Directors of the Circle of Care Burn Foundation, and the former President (and current Vice-President) of the Women’s Jonathan Club of Los Angeles.

In addition to her career and academic credentials, including her membership in the Phi Beta Kappa Society, Kris is a burn survivor and eloquent advocate for this community. She was an original

member of the Children’s Burn Foundation, where, as a longtime friend of Dr. Richard Grossman, she worked diligently to raise funds for the Grossman Burn Center.

“Kris Postil is an inspiring leader of great depth, compassion and success. Her achievements, both personal and professional, are a testament to her values and the lasting principles of her friend and our foundation’s namesake. I look forward to working with Kris, as we further our joint mission to empower the groups and individuals within our local community,” says Lon Morton, Secretary of The Dr. Richard Grossman Community Foundation.


 


PRIZE PUP—Event volunteer Jade Boyce shows off a Labrador retriever puppy that was auctioned for $5,000 at the Boys & Girls Clubs of Greater Conejo Valley fundraiser on Oct. 18.
Photo by John Loesing, Acorn Newspapers

Club asks supporters to Stand Up for Kids
By John Loesing, The Acorn

newstip@theacorn.com

More than 500 people attended the black tie affair that raised money for children’s programming. JOHN LOESING/Acorn Newspapers More than 3,600 children attend the six Boys & Girls Clubs from Calabasas to Thousand Oaks, but not a single child can enjoy the organization’s programs and activities without the support of a giving community.

At the 12th annual Stand For Kids fundraiser Oct. 18 at the Four Seasons Hotel in Westlake Village, volunteers and guests donated their time and money to the Boys & Girls Clubs of Greater Conejo Valley.

More than 500 people attended the reception, dinner and auction.

It was a black tie affair.

Morton Capital Management served as the event co-sponsor along with the Dr. Richard Grossman Community Foundation.

Grossman, a reconstructive and plastic surgeon who founded the Grossman Burn Center in Sherman Oaks in 1969, died at his home in Hidden Valley last March. He was 81.

“He led a life of service that in my experience was unsurpassed,” said his wife, Elizabeth, who accepted an honorary award on behalf of her late husband.

“He was a great supporter of our community and of the Boys & Girls Clubs,” she said.

Newspapers Marilyn Bencar, who has served as the clubs’ secretary at the organization’s inception in 2001, was named winner of the 2014 Cal Johnston Service Award. Johnston founded the local Conejo Valley chapter.

The clubs also named their Youth of The Year winners.

Liam Lecka, winner in the 14-and-older category, is 16 years old and goes to Newbury Park High School.

“The clubs welcomed me with open arms and became my second home,” said Liam, a successful student who became member of the NPHS Associated Student Body.

Winner in the 13-and-under category is Danielle Conner, a 12-year-old Boys & Girls Clubs member who attends Los Cerritos Middle School.

Gala piano solos were provided by Brendon Gong, a seventh grader at Sequoia Middle School, and David Huang, a Boys & Girls alumnus and musical prodigy who is now a senior at Westlake High School.

On stage performances were given by the Los Cerritos Choir and the Boys & Girls Clubs Glee Club.

Westlake Village resident Jim Cathcart served as the evening’s master of ceremonies.

Club locations are at Los Cerritos, Colina, Redwood and Sequoia middle schools in Thousand Oaks as well as Chaparral Elementary School in Calabasas and Lindero Canyon Middle School in Agoura Hills.

The Chaparral site has doubled in size and now serves more than 400 kids, said Boys & Girls Clubs president and chief executive Mark Elswick.

“As Cal Johnston use to say, children are 30 percent of the population and 100 percent of the future,” Elswick said.

As the organization grows, a new building was also added at the Lindero Canyon site.

The Boys & Girls Clubs serve children ages 3 through 15 and are open before and after schools from 7 a.m. to 6:30 p.m. They also offer weekend sports leagues and a 10-week summer camp.

Visit www.bgcconejo.org.


 

Photo by DAVID YAMAMOTO/Ventura County Star

Our Community House of Hope receives grant money for additional room
By Alicia Doyle

Sept. 26, 2014 Ventura County Star

THOUSAND OAKS, Calif. – Our Community House of Hope, a nonprofit serving those who have no care at the end of life, had been turning away requests because of lack of space until the organization recently received a $40,000 grant from the Richard Grossman Community Foundation to establish a fourth bedroom.

A fourth bedroom will enable service for an additional 30 residents in the coming year, said Elizabeth Grossman, of Thousand Oaks, foundation president.

“We awarded the grant because we recognize that end-of-life treatment choices are limited and we were very impressed with the facility, the staff, and the administration,” Grossman said.
Most people, when asked, want to die at home, said Ann Sobel, executive director of Our Community House of Hope in Thousand Oaks.

“However, oftentimes there are not the family and friends who can leave their own lives and jobs to provide the necessary care 24 hours a day,” said Sobel, of Moorpark. “This is a home, not a medical facility. When one enters our home, it looks and feels as such.”

Our Community House of Hope provides 24-hour care for those in their last weeks of life, as well as support to families.

“All care services are free of charge,” Sobel said. “We are funded only through community donations. We do not receive insurance reimbursements or government funding.”

The connection between Our Community House of Hope and the foundation was inspired by Patty Hayes, a board member of Our Community House of Hope who was familiar with the foundation.

“Patty … arranged a visit with them,” Sobel said. “They came to our home, saw what we do, and our conversation about funding needs began.”

The $40,000 grant will help cover caregiver costs, including food, and updating the fourth bedroom for a bed-bound resident.

“When we opened in 2012, we did not have the funding to fill all four beds at once, so instead, seeing the need to serve, we began with two beds,” Sobel said.

As funding has grown, a third bed was added.

“The home has four bedrooms. We desperately needed to open the fourth bed due to community need,” Sobel said.

The grant was made in memory of Beverly Gilmore, former CEO and president of West Hills Hospital, who was a resident of Oxnard until her death in early August.

“Bev was very supportive of Our Community House of Hope and their mission, so we felt that awarding this grant in her memory was appropriate,” Grossman said. “Her legacy of compassion and action will be remembered by all who had the good fortune to know her.”

Tawni Ramos, the current resident of the room, is in her late 20s and a single mother of a young son.

“She is in the midst of a valiant fight against brain cancer, and, in a situation where treatments are ineffective and with nowhere else to go, Our Community House of Hope is an urgent lifeline for this courageous patient,” Sobel said.

Ramos’ mother, who lives in Oregon, is now at her side.

“Thanks to the resourcefulness of an aunt, who contacted us and received quick turnaround within 24 hours, this young mother is resting comfortably in the Beverly J. Gilmore bedroom,” Sobel said.

Copyright 2014 Scripps Media, Inc. All rights reserved. This material may not be published, broadcast, rewritten, or redistributed.


 

BENEFACTOR—The foundation founded by the late Dr. Richard Grossman, seen above with wife Elizabeth, presented the Boys & Girls Clubs of Greater Conejo Valley with a $100,000 grant. Dr. Grossman’s life will be celebrated at a gala on Sat., Oct. 18 in Westlake Village.

GROSSMAN LEGACY HONORED

The Boys & Girls Clubs of Greater Conejo Valley will celebrate the life of Dr. Richard Grossman during the 12th annual Stand Up for our Kids Gala Dinner and Auction on Sat., Oct. 18 at the Four Seasons Hotel in Westlake Village.

“It is an honor to recognize the life of a man who gave so much back, not only to our organization, but to the community in general,” said Gary Stephani, gala chair and member of the board of governors for the clubs.

“The Dr. Richard Grossman Community Foundation has made a significant impact for our local youth and we will always be very appreciative of the support,” he said.

Grossman, a reconstructive and plastic surgeon who founded the Grossman Burn Center in Sherman Oaks in 1969, died on March 13. He was 81.

The Dr. Richard Grossman Community Foundation presented a $100,000 grant to the clubs to support a homework assistance program, Power Hour: Making Minutes Count, during the annual Superstars of the Year event last February.

The annual gala is the main fundraising event for the clubs.

The evening will feature silent and live auctions, gourmet dining, entertainment and dancing.

Proceeds from the gala will benefit programs for youth ages 3 through 14 at six local clubs before and after school as well as weekend sports leagues and summer camp.

For more information, call (818) 706-0905 or visit www.bgcconejo.org.


 

The Dr. Richard Grossman Community Foundation Donates $40,000 to Our Community House of Hope: Establishes the Beverly J. Gilmore Memorial Room for Terminally Ill Residents

The Dr. Richard Grossman Community Foundation announces its $40,000 grant to Our Community House of Hope (OCHH), a non-profit organization that provides care for those in their last weeks of life. This generous contribution will provide necessary upgrades and staffing for a fourth bedroom, to serve an estimated 30 or more residents in 2015.

The grant is in memory of Beverly J. Gilmore, former CEO of West Hills Hospital and a member of the Foundation’s Board of Directors. Mrs. Gilmore passed away on August 5, 2014. The master bedroom at Our Community House of Hope will be named the Beverly J. Gilmore bedroom.

The current resident of that room is a woman in her late twenties, who is the single mother of a young son. She is in the midst of a valiant fight against brain cancer, and, in a situation were treatments are ineffective and with nowhere else to go, OCHH is an urgent lifeline for this courageous patient. Her own mother, who lives in Oregon, is now at her side. Thanks to the resourcefulness of an aunt, who contacted OCHH and received quick turnaround within 24 hours, this young mother is resting comfortably in the Beverly J. Gilmore bedroom.

Her son’s reaction to seeing his mother at peace, surrounded by his grandmother and attentive staff, encapsulates the mission of OCHH: “Mom, I am home!”

“Beverly’s legacy is alive and well, a testament to her compassion and energy. Her values are a living testament to her integrity and love. On behalf of our family, I thank Our Community House of Hope for their decency and inspiring work for the most deserving among us,” says Ken Gilmore, Beverly’s husband.

When terminally ill individuals come to Our Community House of Hope, they often bear the added emotional trauma of feeling brokenhearted and alone. With no more treatment options available to them, and in the absence of loved ones who can provide the 24-hour care they need, OCHH is a beacon of hope and haven from hospitals and conventional care facilities, where over 80% of Americans die from one or more untreatable conditions. At Our Community House of Hope, “death is not a medical event, rather it is a life event.”

“Our Community House of Hope is a wonderful and deserving organization, which complements the leadership of my late husband, Dr. A Richard Grossman, and the values of his namesake Foundation. Uniting families during these challenging moments is a chance for people to experience the care of the most gifted professionals in the most tranquil surroundings. It is an honor for us to award this grant to such a noble recipient,” says Elizabeth Grossman, Board Member of the Dr. Richard Grossman Community Foundation.

Anyone who knows someone in his or her last weeks of life, and wants that friend or loved one to receive compassionate care, may call OCHH at 805-492-6244. For individuals interested in making a financial gift, filling a need on the wish list or volunteering at OCHH information is available at www.ourhouseofhope.org.

About The Dr. Richard Grossman Community Foundation
Headquartered in Calabasas, California, The Dr. Richard Grossman Community Foundation invests in local community groups and resources where its funds will have the greatest impact. Requests for Funding will be by invitation only, and all grants will be carefully monitored for efficacy. The Foundation made its first grant to the Boys and Girls Club of Conejo Valley in February 2014. For more information about the Foundation, please visit www.drgcf.org.


 

Dr. Richard Grossman Community Foundation Announces $115,000 Grant To The Grossman Burn Center At West Hills Hospital & Medical Center

Donation Will Fund Burn Survivor Recovery & Support Programs

CALABASAS, CA, May 13, 2014— Today the Dr. Richard Grossman Community Foundation announced a $115,000 grant to the Grossman Burn Center at West Hills Hospital & Medical Center. The donation funds a variety of burn survivor recovery and support programs and was formalized at a check-signing ceremony attended by Foundation Board Members Lon Morton, Rocky Morton, and Beverly Gilmore. Douglas Long, West Hills Hospital’s Chief Executive Officer, represented the Grossman Burn Center at the ceremony.

Lon Morton commented, “Through this grant we are seeking to do more than simply help the Grossman Burn Center at West Hills Hospital give burn survivors their lives back—we are investing in the legacy our founder, Dr. Richard Grossman. The programs we are supporting serve as a reminder for us all that his presence continues to be felt, and his work goes on.”

The Foundation’s gift will support the Grossman Burn Center’s direct patient assistance efforts, help fund its annual Family Camp, and provide temporary housing for families of burn survivors receiving treatment at West Hills Hospital’s Grossman Burn Center.

Douglas Long added, “I extend my sincere thanks and profound appreciation to the Dr. Richard Grossman Community Foundation for this generous and important donation. The Grossman Burn Center does not just treat patients—it heals them, and the programs this grant will fund are a critically important part of the healing process.”

Today’s donation to West Hills Hospital’s Grossman Burn Center is the Foundation’s second grant since its formation in December 2013. In February, the Foundation donated $100,000 to the Boys and Girls Clubs of Greater Conejo Valley to fund an after-school homework assistance program. Foundation Board Members currently are evaluating several additional local non-profit organizations for potential community grants.


 

Dr. A. Richard Grossman (1933-2014)

Dr. A. Richard Grossman, a renowned plastic and reconstructive surgeon who four decades ago pioneered the comprehensive care of burn patients in Sherman Oaks and established what became the nation’s largest private burn-treatment center, has died. He was 81.

Grossman, who had been the center’s longtime medical director, died suddenly Thursday at home in Thousand Oaks, said his wife, Elizabeth Rice Grossman.
When Grossman arrived at Sherman Oaks Hospital in the late 1960s, he persuaded administrators to set aside two beds for burn patients. By 1978, the ward had expanded to 30 beds, larger than any other private facility devoted to burn care.

On the facility’s 25th anniversary in 1995, it was named the Grossman Burn Center at Sherman Oaks Hospital in honor of the surgeon who pioneered its cutting-edge care.
After 40 years in Sherman Oaks, the center relocated to West Hills Hospital and Medical Center in 2010. Grossman Burn Centers also have been established in Bakersfield, Phoenix and Kansas City, Mo.

Read More



 

The Dr. Richard Grossman Community Foundation featured in Society Magazine

Read More


 

The Calabasas-based Dr. Richard Grossman Community Foundation has approved its first local community investment

a $100,000 grant to the Boys & Girls Clubs of Greater Conejo Valley to support a homework assistance program called: ‘Power Hour: Making Minutes Count’. The grant was officially announced on Friday evening, February 28 during the Boys & Girls Clubs’ ‘Superstars of the Year’ event at the Civic Arts Plaza in Thousand Oaks.
The ‘Power Hour’ program, which is offered weekly Monday through Thursday, is a comprehensive homework help and tutoring program designed to raise academic proficiency. According to officials, 80-90% of parents surveyed stated that their children acquired new skills and became more confident learners as a result of homework assistance programs. And, 85% of parents surveyed said their children enjoy school more and improved their attendance as a result of homework assistance programs.
Dr. A. Richard Grossman stated, “The mission of our Foundation is to invest in the future of our local communities, and to do that, you have to start with education.

Children must be given every opportunity to succeed in school and, through this transformational program, kids in our community are getting the extra help they need to meet their academic challenges and to prepare for a lifetime of achievement. We are pleased to partner with the Boys & Girls Clubs on this important initiative,” he added. In addition to the Boys & Girls Clubs grant, the Foundation currently is conducting due diligence on a series of potential community investments in other local non-profit organizations. The Foundation seeks to allocate its social investment capital across a broad range of community sectors including education, healthcare, and other areas of demonstrated need in the greater Conejo Valley.
Foundation Board Member Elizabeth Rice Grossman commented, “This grant is the first of several investments our Foundation hopes to make as part of our commitment to the local community. Unlike a typical charity, we do not simply give away money, but we invest in local non-profits with a track record of excellence and we monitor those investments for efficacy. By being active, we believe we can make a significant impact in the areas of greatest need in our community,” she added.
About Dr. Richard Grossman Community Foundation
The Dr. Richard Grossman Community Foundation invests in local community groups and resources in the communities throughout the greater Conejo Valley area. Dr. Richard Grossman, for whom the Foundation is named, is an internationally renowned burn surgeon and the founder of the Grossman Burn Center. The Foundation was created in December 2013 as the successor in interest to the former Circle of Care Burn Foundation.


 

The Dr. Richard Grossman Community Foundation was founded in December 2013 to serve local communities in the greater Los Angeles county and Ventura county, The Foundation will be located at the offices of Morton Capital Management in Calabasas and expects to be fully operational by March 31, 2014.

The Foundation plans to invest in local community groups and resources where its funds will have the greatest impact. Requests for Funding will be by invitation only, and all grants will be carefully monitored for efficacy. The Foundation anticipates making its first grant to the Boys and Girls Club of Conejo Valley in March 2014.

Foundation Board Members Elizabeth Rice Grossman, Lon Morton, Bev Gilmore and Rocky Morton have a long history in the investment and asset management sectors, and they will lead the Foundation’s due diligence efforts with respect to future grants to local non-profit organizations. They will lead the Foundation’s efforts to identify opportunities for investment in local health care resources. The Foundation expects to name two additional Board members by the end of the second quarter, 2014.

The Dr. Richard Grossman Community Foundation is the successor in interest to the Circle of Care Burn Foundation, which voted to divide itself into two separate entities in December 2013.